Using cameras close to high intensity energy sources, such as laser devices and other sources

Using cameras close to high intensity energy sources, such as laser devices and other sources

 

What is the maximum power density from an object that the camera can take?

We have this text under Cautions in our camera documentation

“Do not point the infrared camera (with or without the lens cover) at intensive energy sources, for example devices that emit laser radiation, or the sun. This can have an unwanted effect on the accuracy of the camera. It can also cause damage to the detector in the camera.”

Sometimes the application is to examine objects in a laser environment. Here are some guidelines.

We have no information regarding the detector sensitivity for lasers. However, the detector is sensitive to the input power so you can compare the laser average power with the input power to the detector in “normal” operation. The detector window has a cut-on filter at about 7.5 µm so the detector is only sensitive to radiations above 7.5 µm. The sensitivity begins to drop at about 13 µm but it is probably sensitive up to 20 µm. The camera optics will also start to absorb around 13 µm (Germanium lenses).

If you look at the sun (6000°C) for a short while with the camera you might see some burn-in effects that will disappear after some minutes but you will not damage the detector.

6000°C (7.5-15 µm) corresponds to an energy level of about 2 W/cm2 at the detector.
500°C (7.5-15 µm) corresponds to an energy level of 100 mW/cm2.

The 100 mW/cm2 continuous input power is without any risk.
You should not exceed 2 W/cm2 continuous input power.

We have no information regarding the maximum energy that the detector can handle during a short laser pulse.